About Retinal Detachment

The retina is a light sensitive membrane, which is located at the back of the eye. When light passes through the eye, the lens focuses the image onto the retina and the retina converts the image to signals that are sent to the brain via the optic nerves. Retina works with the cornea, lens and other parts of the eye to create the visions in the brain.

Retinal detachment happens when the retina separates from the back of the eye. Retinal detachment can cause partial or complete vision loss depending on the amount of retina detached. Retinal detachment is a medical emergency and when it occurs the cells may be deprived of oxygen. Untreated or delayed treatment can result in permanent vision loss.

There are 3 types of retinal detachment

  • Rhegmatogenous – happens when there is a tear or hole in the retina, which allows fluid from within the eye to slip through the opening and get behind the retina. The fluid separates the retina from the membrane that gives nourishment and oxygen. The pressure from fluid can push the retina away from the RPE (retinal pigment epithelium) and cause it to detach.
  • Tractional Retinal Detachment – happens when the scar tissue on the retina contracts and causes the retina to pull away from the back of the eye. This is a less common type of detachment and generally affects people with diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to problems with the retinal vascular system and cause scar tissue in the eye that could cause detachment.
  • Exudative Detachment – no tears or breaks occur in the retina. This type of detachment is usually caused by a retinal disease like inflammatory disorder or coats disease that can cause abnormal development in the blood vessels behind the retina.

Risk factors for Retinal detachment to occur include

  • Being over the age of 40
  • A trauma to the eye
  • Having a family history of retinal detachment
  • Extreme nearsightedness
  • PVD (posterior vitreous detachment)
  • Diabetes
  • Complications due to cataract surgery

Usually when there is a Retinal detachment there is no sign of pain but there are some symptoms such as

  • Blurred vision
  • Partial vision loss
  • Flashes of light when looking to the sides
  • Ares of darkness in the field of vision
  • Sudden vision of many floaters

Retinal Detachment Procedure

In most cases of retinal detachment a surgery is needed. There are various types of surgeries available

Photocoagulation – if there is a hole or tear in the retina but the retina is still attached a photocoagulation (laser) will be used. The laser burns around the tear area and the resulting scarring affixes the retina to the back of the eye.

Cryopexy – a freezing probe is applied to the tear site and the resulting scarring will help the retina in place. The eye will be numbed using eye drops.

Pneumatic Retinopexy – repairs minor detachments. A gas bubble will be put in the eye to help the retina move back into place. A laser will be used to seal the holes.

Scleral Buckling – pushes the wall of the eye into the retina to get it back into place.

Vitrectomy – this technique is used for larger tear sites. The procedure includes anesthesia and is done on an outpatient basis. Small tools are used to remove the scar tissue and fluid from the retina and then the retina is put back into place.

Before Retinal Detachment Surgery

  • Patients are advised to not eat or drink from 6 hours before the surgery
  • Patients must stop any medication and herbal supplements a few days before the surgery
  • Patients must make sure they arrange someone to come with them for and after the surgery
  • Patients must not wear any makeup before the surgery

After Retinal Detachment Surgery

• Patients must take medication prescribed by the ophthalmologist correctly and on time

• Patients must rest and activity must be limited for a week after the surgery

• Eye patch will be necessary and kept at night whilst sleeping

• Driving is not allowed until vision is stabilized

• Patients can return to work after 2 weeks from the surgery depending on the recovery

Risks of Retinal Detachment Surgery

There is a small possibility of complications occurring even though they are very rare as the success of the surgery is about 90%. The possible complications are

• Bleeding

• More holes in the retina

• Bruising

• Glaucoma

• Cataract

• Double vision

• Allergy to anesthetic or medication

• Infection

Definition

Optic nerve – the paired nerve that transmits visual info from the retina to the brain

Retina – the inner coat of the eye

Cornea – transparent part of the eye covering the iris and pupil

First day of Retinal Detachment Surgery

The patient will attend a consultation with the ophthalmologist and will be advised about the procedure and their condition. The patient will then be taken through a couple of tests that are required before the treatment. If desired, patients can spend the day to rest and attend the clinic the next day.

Second day of Retinal Detachment Surgery

Retinal Detachment Surgery will be performed. The duration of the surgery depends on the surgery and technique used by the ophthalmologist. The surgery is usually done under local anesthetic using a retinal photocoagulation laser device and a laser indirect ophthalmoscope depending on the type of treatment performed. Once the surgery is over and the patient is feeling better, they are then able to return to their settlement.

Third day of Retinal Detachment Surgery

Patients will attend a post surgery check up and consultation. If they are approved to be in a good, healthy condition and the surgery results were all successful; the patients are advised with post treatment care requirements and are ready to go back to their normal routine.

Notes

• Trip schedule may vary. medicTurkey patient relations will provide you a detailed trip schedule before the travel.

• For details on accommodation, transportation and other services, please check the SERVICES page.

What is Retinal Detachment?

Retinal detachment is the surgery to place the detached retina back into its place. There are 3 types of retinal detachment

  • Rhegmatogenous – there is a tear or hole in the retina, which allows fluid from within the eye to slip through the opening and get behind the retina.
  • Tractional Retinal Detachment – happens when the scar tissue on the retina contracts and causes the retina to pull away from the back of the eye.
  • Exudative Detachment – no tears or breaks occur in the retina.

How is Retinal Detachment surgery done?

The surgery is done in various ways such as

Photocoagulation – if there is a hole or tear in the retina but the retina is still attached a photocoagulation (laser). The laser burns around the tear area and the resulting scarring affixes the retina to the back of the eye.

Cryopexy – a freezing probe is applied to the tear site and  the resulting scarring will help the retina in place. The eye will be numbed using eye drops.

Pneumatic Retinopexy – repairs minor detachments. A gas bubble will be put in the eye to help the retina move back into place. A laser will be used to seal the holes.

Scleral Buckling – pushes the wall of the eye into the retina to get it back into place.

Vitrectomy – Small tools are used to remove the scar tissue and fluid from the retina and then the retina is put back into place.

How long does Retinal Detachment surgery take?

The duration of the surgery depends on the surgery and technique used by the ophthalmologist.

How long do I need to stay at hospital?

The surgery is usually done on an outpatient basis so the patient is sent home a few hours after the surgery.

How long do I need to stay in Turkey?

The recommended stay in Turkey for Retinal Detachment surgery is 2-3 days including consultation before the surgery and after the surgery.

Who can have Retinal Detachment surgery?

The surgery can be done on both males and females who are mentally and psychically stable and have a detached retina.

When can I return to work?

Patients are able to return to work after 3 weeks from the surgery.

Are there any risks of Retinal Detachment surgery?

Just like every surgery there is a slight risk of complications to occur such as

  • Bleeding
  • More holes in the retina
  • Bruising
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataract
  • Double vision
  • Allergy to anesthetic or medication
  • Infection

Devices used in Retinal Detachment Surgery

Depending on the type of procedure a retinal photocoagulation laser device and a laser indirect ophthalmoscope device is used.

Operation Price Stay in hospital Stay in Turkey
Retinal Detachment Please fill in
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about the pricing.
The surgery is done on an
outpatient basis
2-3 Days

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